Safety Rescue Hooks

Safety Rescue Hooks – All You Need To Know

Electrical voltages in Electric & Hybrid vehicles are significantly higher than in a regular vehicle. These volts can be up to 650 Volts direct current (DC).

In dry conditions, accidental contact with parts that are live at voltages about 110 Volts DC can be fatal. Components may retain a dangerous voltage & can be generated by the movement of the drive wheels even when a vehicle is switched off. The body rescue hook is a “must have” life-saving device in all of your electrical safety areas.

Safety Hooks Save Lives

Rescue hooks are an essential electrical safety item for the retrieval of victims from electric shock. Electrical safety rescue hooks protect the rescuer against electrical shock.

They are commonly found in electrical substations, but now with the growth of electric & hybrid vehicles, they should become common place in vehicle maintenance workshops. You hope to never need one! However it should be there if the worst was to happen.

Our 1kV Safety Rescue hook is made from Black HD polyethylene with high temperature stabiliser additive, and 2% U.V. stabiliser for high U.V. protection.

What Should You Do

Always switch off the power supply when an emergency rescue is undertaken, whenever this is possible. The First Aider should always assume that he/she is working on a live installation, and use the safety rescue hook.

There is always a possibility of a back feed or a charged Power Capacitor on systems where the emergency is taking place
Emergency Resuscitation Procedure for Electrocution Victims

Step 1

Look over the area of the incident carefully. Rushing in to save someone might be your first impulse, but if the danger of electrical shock remains you will only injure yourself as well. Take a moment to assess the scene and look for any obvious dangers

• Check for the source of the electrical shock. Look to see if the victim is still in contact with the source. Remember that electricity can flow through the victim and into you.
• Never use water, even if there is a fire, as water can conduct electricity.
• Never enter an area where electrical equipment is used if the floor is wet.
• Use a fire extinguisher made for electrical fires.
• Call the emergency services

Step 2

Shut off the current. If you can do so safely, turn off the electrical current. Don’t attempt to rescue someone near a high-voltage line. Shutting off the current at the power box, the circuit breaker or the fuse box is the preferred option. Follow these steps to turn the power off with a circuit breaker box:

• Open the circuit breaker box. Look for a rectangular block, with a handle, at the top of the fuse box.
• Grab the handle and flip it to the other side, just like a light switch.
• Try turning on a light or other electrical device to double check the power is off.

Step 3

Separate the victim from the source. Don’t touch the victim, even with a non-conducting instrument, if the electricity hasn’t been shut off. Once you’re sure there is no current, use your Safety Rescue Hook to separate the victim from the source.

Step 4

Place the victim in the recovery position. Placing the victim of electrical shock in the recovery position will ensure that her airway remains clear. Follow these steps to properly put the victim in the recovery position:

• Place the arm nearest to you at a right angle with her body.
• Place the other hand under the side of her head. The back of the hand should touch the cheek.
• Bend the farthest knee at a right angle.
• Roll the victim on the side. The top arm will support the head.
• Lift the chin of the victim and check the airway.
• Stay with the victim and monitor her breathing. Once in recovery position, don’t move the victim, as this can cause further injury.

Step 5

Apply CPR, if needed. Only after being separated from the electrical source, check the victim’s vital signs. Perform CPR or rescue breathing if breathing has stopped or seems slow.

Store your rescue hook near your electrical shock poster. Available now in out shop.